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The Study of the Cocker Spaniel

The newly illustrated "Blue Book, The Study of the Cocker Spaniel," is now available for sale. This wonderful book, a must for all Cocker Spaniel fanciers, can be ordered from the ASC Secretary. Send your check or money order (in U.S. funds only) for $12 (includes shipping and handling) or $14 outside the U.S., made payable to:
American Spaniel Club, Inc.
P. O. Box 4194
Frankfort, KY 40604-4194

The Study of the Cocker Spaniel General Appearance

The Cocker Spaniel is the smallest member of the Sporting Group. He has a sturdy, compact body and a cleanly chiseled and refined head, with the overall dog in complete balance and of ideal size. He stands well up at the shoulder on straight forelegs with a topline sloping slightly toward strong, moderately bent, muscular quarters. He is a dog capable of considerable speed, combined with great endurance. Above all, he must be free and merry, sound, well balanced throughout and in action show a keen inclination to work. A dog well balanced in all parts is more desirable than a dog with strongly contrasting good points and faults.

Size, Proportion, Substance

Size-The ideal height at the withers for an adult dog is 15 inches and for an adult bitch, 14 inches. Height may vary one-half inch above or below this ideal. A dog whose height exceeds 15-1/2 inches or a bitch whose height exceeds 14-1/2 inches shall be disqualified. An adult dog whose height is less than 14-1/2 inches and an adult bitch whose height is less than 13-1/2 inches shall be penalized. Height is determined by a line perpendicular to the ground from the top of the shoulder blades, the dog standing naturally with its forelegs and lower hind legs parallel to the line of measurement. Proportion-The measurement from the breast bone to back of thigh is slightly longer than the measurement from the highest point of withers to the ground. The body must be of sufficient length to permit a straight and free stride; the dog never appears long and low.

Head

The Study of the Cocker Spaniel To attain a well proportioned head, which must be in balance with the rest of the dog, it embodies the following:

  • Expression-The expression is intelligent, alert, soft and appealing.
  • Eyes-Eyeballs are round and full and look directly forward. The shape of the eye rims gives a slightly almond shaped appearance; the eye is not weak or goggled. The color of the iris is dark brown and in general the darker the better.
  • Ears-Lobular, long, of fine leather, well feathered, and placed no higher than a line to the lower part of the eye.
  • Skull-Rounded but not exaggerated with no tendency toward flatness; the eyebrows are clearly defined with a pronounced stop. The bony structure beneath the eyes is well chiseled with no prominence in the cheeks. The muzzle is broad and deep, with square even jaws. To be in correct balance, the distance from the stop to the tip of the nose is one half the distance from the stop up over the crown to the base of the skull. The Study of the Cocker Spaniel
  • Nose-of sufficient size to balance the muzzle and foreface, with well developed nostrils typical of a sporting dog. It is black in color in the blacks, black and tans, and black and whites; in other colors it may be brown, liver or black, the darker the better. The color of nose harmonizes with the color of the eye rim.
  • Lips-The upper lip is full and of sufficient depth to cover the lower jaw.
  • Teeth-Teeth strong and sound, not too small and meet in a scissors bite.


Neck, Topline, Body

  • Neck-The neck is sufficiently long to allow the nose to reach the ground easily, muscular and free from pendulous "throatiness." It rises strongly from the shoulders and arches slightly as it tapers to join the head. The Study of the Cocker Spaniel
  • Topline-sloping slightly toward muscular quarters.
  • Body-The chest is deep, its lowest point no higher than the elbows, its front sufficiently wide for adequate heart and lung space, yet not so wide as to interfere with the straightforward movement of the forelegs. Ribs are deep and well sprung. Back is strong and sloping evenly and slightly downward from the shoulders to the set-on of the docked tail. The docked tail is set on and carried on a line with the topline of the back, or slightly higher; never straight up like a Terrier and never so low as to indicate timidity. When the dog is in motion the tail action is merry.


Forequarters

The shoulders are well laid back forming an angle with the upper arm of approximately 90 degrees which permits the dog to move his forelegs in an easy manner with forward reach. Shoulders are clean-cut and sloping without protrusion and so set that the upper points of the withers are at an angle which permits a wide spring of rib. When viewed from the side with the forelegs vertical, the elbow is directly below the highest point of the shoulder blade. Forelegs are parallel, straight, strongly boned and muscular and set close to the body well under the scapulae. The pasterns are short and strong. Dewclaws on forelegs may be removed. Feet compact, large, round and firm with horny pads; they turn neither in nor out.

Hindquarters

Hips are wide and quarters well rounded and muscular. When viewed from behind, the hind legs are parallel when in motion and at rest. The hind legs are strongly boned, and muscled with moderate angulation at the stifle and powerful, clearly defined thighs. The stifle is strong and there is no slippage of it in motion or when standing. The hocks are strong and well let down. Dewclaws on hind legs may be removed.

Coat

On the head, short and fine; on the body, medium length, with enough undercoating to give protection. The ears, chest, abdomen and legs are well feathered, but not so excessively as to hide the Cocker Spaniel's true lines and movement or affect his appearance and function as a moderately coated sporting dog. The texture is most important. The coat is silky, flat or slightly wavy and of a texture which permits easy care. Excessive coat or curly or cottony textured coat shall be severely penalized. Use of electric clippers on the back coat is not desirable. Trimming to enhance the dog's true lines should be done to appear as natural as possible.

Color and Markings

  • Black Variety-Solid color black to include black with tan points. The black should be jet; shadings of brown or liver in the coat are not desirable. A small amount of white on the chest and/or throat is allowed; white in any other location shall disqualify.
  • Any Solid Color Other than Black (ASCOB)-Any solid color other than black, ranging from lightest cream to darkest red, including brown and brown with tan points. The color shall be of a uniform shade, but lighter color of the feathering is permissible. A small amount of white on the chest and/or throat is allowed; white in any other location shall disqualify.
  • Parti-Color Variety-Two or more solid, well broken colors, one of which must be white; black and white, red and white (the red may range from lightest cream to darkest red), brown and white, and roans, to include any such color combination with tan points. It is preferable that the tan markings be located in the same pattern as for the tan points in the Black and ASCOB varieties. Roans are classified as parti-colors and may be of any of the usual roaning patterns. Primary color which is ninety percent (90%) or more shall disqualify. Tan Points-The color of the tan may be from the lightest cream to the darkest red and is restricted to ten percent (10%) or less of the color of the specimen; tan markings in excess of that amount shall disqualify. In the case of tan points in the Black or ASCOB variety, the markings shall be located as follows:
    • On the sides of the muzzle and on the cheeks;
    • On the underside of the ears;
    • On all feet and/or
    • A clear tan spot over each eye;
    • legs;
    • Under the tail;
    • On the chest, optional; presence or absence shall not be penalized.
  • Tan markings which are not readily visible or which amount only to traces, shall be penalized. Tan on the muzzle which extends upward, over and joins shall also be penalized. The absence of tan markings in the Black or ASCOB variety in any of the specified locations in any otherwise tan-pointed dog shall disqualify.


Gait

The Study of the Cocker Spaniel The Cocker Spaniel, though the smallest of the sporting dogs, possesses a typical sporting dog gait. Prerequisite to good movement is balance between the front and rear assemblies. He drives with strong, powerful rear quarters and is properly constructed in the shoulders and forelegs so that he can reach forward without constriction in a full stride to counterbalance the driving force from the rear. Above all, his gait is coordinated, smooth and effortless. The dog must cover ground with his action; excessive animation should not be mistaken for proper gait.

Temperament

Equable in temperament with no suggestion of timidity.

DISQUALIFICATIONS

Height-Males over 15-1/2 inches; females over 14-1/2 inches.

Color and Markings-The aforementioned colors are the only acceptable colors or combination of colors. Any other colors or combination of colors to disqualify.

Black Variety-White markings except on chest and throat.

Any Solid Color Other Than Black Variety-White markings except on chest and throat.

Parti-color Variety-Primary color ninety percent (90%) or more.

Tan Points
(1) Tan markings in excess of ten percent (10%);

(2) Absence of tan markings in Black or ASCOB Variety in any of the specified locations in an otherwise tan pointed dog.

Approved May 12, 1992
Effective June 30, 1992

Illustrations are not to be reproduced without written consent from ASC.

This is from the AKC Judges Newsletter to help clarify the roan color and in no way reflects any change to the approved 1992 standard as written above.

Roans are classified as Parti-Colors and can be any of the usual roaning pattern. They have colored hair intermixed with white hair, but the colored hair is not white tipped. They may be totally roaned with or without head markings, with or without body markings or any such dog with tan points. Primary color which is ninety percent (90%) or more shall disqualify.

 

Earlier the National Nominating Committee presented the following nominees to serve 2-year terms (1-18 to 1-20) as officers of the club.:

 

President — Diane Kepley 

1st VP — Julie Virosteck 

2nd VP — Kathy Egeland-Brock

 

Now the Zone Nominating Committees have finished their work and are nominating the following individuals to serve as Directors and Alternates for 2-Year terms (1-18 until 1-20).

 

Zone 1 

Director — Stacy Dobmeier; Alternate — Vivian Hudson

 

Zone 2

Director — Dale Ward; Alternate — Karin Linde Klerholm

 

Zone 3

Director — Bonnie Buell; Alternate — Lisa Arnett

 

Zone 4

Director — Linda McLean; Alternate — Lane Tarantino 

 

Zone 5

Director — Alan Santos; Alternate — DeAnn Jepson

 

Any members who were not nominated by these committees may run by petition received by the Secretary on or before November 15th. Requirements for the petitions are contained in Article IV, Section 2 of the bylaws found on the ASC website under Documents.

 


Just a reminder that the ASC Board is soliciting member input prior to taking action on the proposed bylaw changes. The 30 day comment period ends on October 28, 2017.


Please post any comments or questions to the ASC Yahoo List or send your comments to me, Tony Stallard, privately if you so desire. a4r4s4@aol.com 


 

The ballots to vote on the proposed standard revisions were mailed to all ASC members on Wednesday, September 20, 2017.  In returning the ballots, please follow the instructions in order to insure that you are sending in valid ballots. There are four ballots, one for each proposed change.


The ballots MUST BE RECEIVED BY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2017 to be valid.

 


HUNT TEST ANNOUNCED


ASC will be hosting a hunt test open to all registered breeds of flushing spaniels, Airedale Terriers, Irish Water Spaniels, and select Retriever breeds. This hunt test will be held on October 28 & 29, 2017 in Jacobus, Pennsylvania. Any one that is interested in receiving a premium list for this test or for being tested for the WD/WDX please contact 
Patrician Petraglia at px3@msn.com


Harvey Update - ASCF Disaster Relief Fund (click here)


 

***************************** FLUSHING SPANIEL SHOW 2018 U P D A T E *****************************

Due to unforeseen delays with the building improvement construction, the Knoxville Exhibition Center will not be ready in time for our January show. Therefore, we will move the show to the Jacob Building at Chilhowee Park (2201 E. Magnolia Avenue, Knoxville).

The venue is a short 5 ½ miles (approximately 10 min.) drive from the Holiday Inn. The Knoxville Convention Center team has committed to making this unexpected transition as seamless as possible. We are working with Visit Knoxville (Convention & Visitors Bureau) to provide shuttle service for our members and guests to/from the Holiday Inn and the show venue.

More information will be available shortly as the Show Committee works on the logistics of the Show.  For now, we recommend that everyone who has reservations at the Holiday Inn, KEEP them. The few motels located by the facility are not recommended by the KCC or Chilhowee Park management. However, if you would like to cancel your reservation, please DO NOT call the Holiday Inn.  Please contact Jane Williams.  We have a waiting list for rooms and we need to facilitate the room change or the room will go back to general hotel inventory. 


ASC 2017 National Specialty DVD Clips

Best in Futurity July 2017

Best of Breed  July 2017

Junior handlers July 2017 


Latest report from Dr. Aguirre/University of PA cataract study

ASCF WEBINAR Report and Presentation